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Copyright/Information Law Update for Librarians and Library Staff
Tuesday, August 9, 10:30 – 12:00 PM, Library West Room 212
Training Facilitators: Christine Fruin

During this session librarians and library staff will be updated on several copyright and information law and policy issues that impact their daily work and responsibilities. Topics to be covered include: fair use after the Georgia State and Google decisions, public access mandates, captioning of library instructional materials, and public performance rights and DVDs in the library. There will be ample time for discussion, so please bring your questions or examples.

 

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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How Librarians Use, Implement, and Can Support Researcher Identifiers - NISO
Wednesday, August 10, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 PM, Library West 419

 


Consistency in metadata is repeatedly discussed as problem in information management and delivery of digital resources.  One core element of that metadata is the use of controlled vocabularies and authority control.  These methods can also be applied to various elements of the research process.  Recently, a variety of projects have gained traction within the research community to identify elements of the process that will support discovery, linking and interaction with research outputs.  These systems and approaches include ORCID, DataCite, FundRef, CREDIT and others.  This webinar will focus on the role that libraries and publishers can play in fostering these systems in their work.  In addition to updates on a few of these initiatives, this webinar will also highlight the implementation of these systems in the research lifecycle.

Agenda

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Are All Systematic Reviews Created Equal? - MLA
Wednesday, August 10, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 PM, Health Science Center Libraries, C2-041A

Connie Schardt, AHIP, FMLA,  Adjunct Faculty at the School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill


The number of published systematic reviews has increased dramatically over the last fifteen years. Are they all good? Like any other study, a systematic review needs to be read with a critical eye. There are specific criteria for critically appraising a published systematic review. Understanding these criteria and applying them to a systematic review will give you more confidence in the conclusions you draw from a review. Join Connie Schardt, AHIP, FMLA, in this MLA webinar as she explains how to critically appraise a systematic review and the tools needed for the task.

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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T&P Series: Midterm Review

Wednesday, August 24, 2016, 10:00 – 11:00 PM, Marston Library Room 136

Presenters Brian Keith and Laurie Taylor, with panelists Neelam Bharti and Suzan Alteri

 

This T&P Support Series session will provide an overview of the midterm review process, followed by a discussion of the mid-career packet preparation and insight from librarians who recently underwent the Midterm Review process. The session is intended for those new to the T&P process or those who are preparing their packets for the Midterm review, but faculty mentors, supervisors, and Chairs of faculty in the T&P process are welcome to attend.


 

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Survive, Thrive & Boost Your Research Productivity - ALA
Wednesday, August 24, 2016, 2:00 - 3:00 PM, Library West Room 419

 


Publish or Perish is the reality for those in academic library tenure and promotion tracks. But where do you begin on a research project and then manage to find the considerable time it takes to pull it through to completion? Daily work-related tasks already may be overwhelming and deadline-driven. How do you then add and juggle a research project in the mix? This webinar will provide practical strategies for jump-starting your scholarly research agenda, increasing research productivity, and managing your time for optimal sanity and results.

 

Learning outcomes:

           

Participants will learn practical strategies for:

* Identifying suitable research topics.

* Managing time to allow for research productivity.

* Managing the research process.

* Prioritizing competing and multiple demands.

* Synergizing work and research goals.

 

Presenter:

Marie L. Radford, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Information and Library Studies, at the Rutgers School of Communication and Information. She makes frequent presentations on topics that include assessment, professional communication, time management, customer service, conflict management, and positive approaches to problematic people. Her forthcoming books are: Library Conversations: Reclaiming Interpersonal Communication Theory for Understanding Professional Encounters, co-authored with Gary Radford and Research Methods in Library and Information Science, 6th Ed. with Lynn Silipigni Connaway.

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


 

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The Interoperability Imperative: Helping Researchers Store, Share and Re-use Data - NFAIS

Monday, August 29, 2016, 9:00 – 10:45 AM, Marston Library Room 136

 

 

In a landscape inundated with data-driven research output, institutional repositories and content provider partnerships are beginning to take more of a hold than ever in the scholarly research community. This combination is helping foster the mapping of metadata to increase and allow functionality across external systems to better serve the needs of end users.

 

This fast-evolving dynamic fits into a wider trend (or necessity) of making systems interoperable so that researchers can input their research in one place and be able to access and share it seamlessly across multiple platforms.  

 

In this NFAIS webinar, join us for an in-depth discussion on:

  • The “Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles” developed to make research data an integral part of the scholarly record
  • The newly announced initiative connecting the Institutional Repository at the University of Florida with Elsevier’s Science Direct platform
  • Elsevier’s recent acquisition of Hivebench and how this development is creating solutions for researchers dealing with the complexity of research data
  • Ethical considerations for research that cut across and are shared between researchers and individuals, repositories, funding bodies and content platforms

 

Our presenters are (in order of appearance):

 

Maryann Martone, Professor and Co-Director, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, UC San Diego

 

Judith Russell, Dean of University Libraries, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida

 

Wouter Haak, Vice President, Research Data Management, Elsevier

 

Dr. Subhajit Basu FRSA, Associate Professor, Information Technology Law, University of Leeds.

 

Our presenters also will discuss and examine the challenges – and possible solutions – around the complexity of managing data, as well as concomitant privacy and related legal issues.


 

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Data Curation - Cultivating Past Research Data for Future Consumption - NISO Virtual Conference
Wednesday, August 31, 2016, 11:00 - 5:00 PM, Library West Room 419

 


Research data is an increasingly important component of communicating science. Responsibility to provide curation support for research data is falling on libraries, repositories, and archives. Support for research data is no small task, requiring expertise in data management, field-specific metadata structures, integration and sharing issues, potentially access control, and even rights management and privacy concerns. Cultivation and curation of this new form of scientific information at scale is a service that many in the scholarly world are expecting the library to manage, and librarians are well positioned to provide.

This virtual conference will explore the many aspects of data curation, including trusted-repository certification, metadata creation and management specific to data, systems deployment issues, facilitation of data sharing services, and data control issues. Speakers will provide first-hand experience of the unique challenges presented by curating data. The session will close with a panel discussion of future trends in data management and how libraries can prepare now to address them.

Preliminary Agenda

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Library of Congress Classification (LCC): Introduction (Session 1) - ALCTS

Wednesday, September 7, 2016, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Library West 419

 

This session will briefly introduce the history of LC Classification (LCC) and the general principles of classification. Participants will be introduced to the Classification and Shelflisting Manual and learn how to make use of Classification Web, Authorities.loc.gov and the freely-available LCC schedules to select classification numbers. There will be special focus on the use of the LC Cutter table and when to use it.

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the principles of classification
  • Select appropriate LCC class numbers based on the subject analysis of the resource
  • Construct appropriate Cutters for topics and authorized access points

 

Presenter:

 

Bobby Bothmann is metadata and emerging technologies librarian at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and professor in Library Services. Bobby catalogs books, electronic resources, and investigates new technologies. He holds an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee and an MS in Geography & English Technical Communication from MSU Mankato. Bobby is also adjunct instructor for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

 

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Library of Congress Classification (LCC): Intermediate (Session 2) - ALCTS

Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM, Library West 419

 

This session will focus on the selection and construction of LC Classification (LCC) call numbers for literature, maps and atlases, and moving images, including the construction of cutters for literary works and juvenile belle lettres.

Prerequisites: Catalogers with some experience with classification or those who have attended Part 1 in this series.

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Construct Cutters for literary works
  • Construct literary author numbers and Cutters for juvenile belle lettres (PZ schedule)
  • Construct call numbers for maps and atlases
  • Apply the existing LCC PN schedule for moving images
  • Learn about alternatives to the PN schedule for moving images

Presenter:

Bobby Bothmann is metadata and emerging technologies librarian at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and professor in Library Services. Bobby catalogs books, electronic resources, and investigates new technologies. He holds an MLIS from the University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee and an MS in Geography & English Technical Communication from MSU Mankato. Bobby is also adjunct instructor for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

 

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Discovering The Nygren Studio For Digital Scholarship & Collaboration

Thursday, September 8, 2016, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM, Library West 212 (Scott Nygren Scholars Studio)

Training Facilitators:  Diana Dombrowski and Judith Roberts

 

The Scott Nygren Studio in Library West provides technology and space to support digital humanities scholarship.  For users looking to explore interdisciplinary digital humanities research and practice, the studio offers a wide variety of technology for digital projects and collaborations.  The studio is also equipped with software for instruction, project meetings, and media presentations.  On September 8, join Diana Dombrowski, manager of the Nygren Studio, and Judith Roberts, Instruction Consultant, Libraries' Human Resources Office, for an overview of the studio and its capabilities.

 

Learning Objectives

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

 

•       Explore the functionality of the large LED screens with their multi-touch displays

•       Connect their own devices (laptop, tablet, mobile phone) to the studio computers via Air Media

•       Understand how different group arrangements in the flexible space can facilitate collaboration

•       Receive a brief overview of software that's available for instruction, such as, Adobe Creative Suite

 

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Planning Exhibitions with Special Collections Materials

Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 1:00 - 2:30 PM, Library West 419

Training Facilitators: Lourdes Santamaría-Wheeler and John Nemmers

 

In this workshop you will learn about exhibit planning, curation, and utilizing Special Collections materials. It will cover policies, procedures, and best practices, as they relate to exhibit conceptualization, scheduling, available spaces, funding, research and object selection, working with rare and unique materials, communicating with other units, digitization, label writing, publicity, and borrowing/loaning materials.

Learning Outcomes
This is required training for curators, librarians and any other personnel who want to participate in the planning and curation of an exhibit using Libraries spaces and/or holdings. Even if you have curated exhibits before, you should participate in this training because policies, procedures and resources are improving regularly.

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Teaching Topics: Open and Close with Impact (NN/LM) 

Thursday, September 22, 2016, 3:00 - 4:00 PM, Health Science Center Libraries, C2-041C

Presenter:  Jessi Van Der Volgen and Rebecca Brown, Training Development Specialists with the NN/LM Training Office

 

Target Audience:  Instruction Librarians and Staff Members who conduct training

 

Spend 60 minutes with Jessi Van Der Volgen and Rebecca Brown, Training Development Specialists with the National Network of Libraries of Medicine’s Training Office (NTO), to learn ways to incorporate opening and closing activities that will enhance learning and evoke critical thinking. MLA members will be eligible for one hour of MLA CE credit.

 

After attending this session you will be able to answer questions such as:

 

  • Why should we craft how we begin and end a class?
  • What’s the difference between an ice-breaker and an opener?
  • What are some ideas for openers I can put into place?
  • What are some content-related activities I can incorporate into the last class or last minutes of class?
  • How can I support critical thinking till the very end?
  • How can I get feedback about course content without using a traditional evaluation tool?

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Data Management Plan Training

Thursday, September, 22, 2016, 1:00 - 2:00 PM, Marston Science Library, Room 308

Training Facilitators:  Plato Smith and David Van Kleeck

 

This training workshop will introduce participants to (1) key stakeholders responsible for effective data management, (2) key components of a data management plan, (3) key data lifecycle processes involved in a data management plan, (4) some UF infrastructure and resources to include in a data management plan, and (5) the DMPTool that allows participants to develop a data management plan.

Learning Objectives:
Participants will learn to consider the various stakeholders needed in the curation of data throughout its lifecycle, why developing a data management is important for current and future research, and how to develop a data management plan using the DMPTool.

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Collections as Data: Stewardship and Use Models to Enhance Access - Library of Congress

Tuesday, September, 27, 2016, 8:30 - 5:00 PM, Library West Room 419

 

The rise of accessible digital collections coupled with the development of tools for processing and analyzing data has enabled researchers to create new models of scholarship and inquiry. The National Digital Initiatives team invites leaders and experts from organizations that are collecting, preserving and providing researcher access to digital collections as data to share best practices and lessons learned. This event will also highlight new collaborative initiatives at the Library of Congress that seek to enhance researcher engagement and the use of digital collections as data.

 

9:00-10:00 a.m.
  • Opening Remarks, Jane McAuliffe, Library of Congress
  • "Data and Humans: A Love Story," Jer Thorp (BIO), Office for Creative Research.
10:00-10:45 a.m. Digital Humanities at the Library of Congress
  • National Digital Initiatives, Kate Zwaard (BIO), Library of Congress
  • Archives Unleashed, Matthew Weber (BIO), Rutgers University
  • NEH's Chronicling America Data Challenge, Leah Weinryb Grohsgal, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Deborah Thomas, Library of Congress
10:45-11:00 a.m. Break
11:00-12:15 p.m. Working Collections as Data
  • "Image-Based Classifier for Detecting Poetic Content in Historic Newspaper Collections," Elizabeth Lorang, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • "Virtual Reunification of Dispersed Archival Photographs," Ricardo Punzalan, University of Maryland
  • "Crowdsourcing Oral History Transcripts," Shana Kimball, NYPL Labs
12:15-1:30 p.m. Lunch, on your own
1:30-2:45 p.m. Concerns for Data Scholarship
  • "Documenting the Now Project," Bergis Jules (BIO), UC Riverside
  • Nicole Saylor, American Folklife Center (BIO), Library of Congress
  • Maciej Ceglowski, Pinboard
2:45-3:00 p.m.. Break
3:00-4:15 p.m. Developing Communities of Practice
  • "Digging Deeper, Reaching Further: Libraries Empowering Users to Mine the HathiTrust Digital Library Resources," Harriett Green (BIO), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • "Synergies Among Digital Humanities and African American History and Culture: An Integrated Research and Training Model," Trevor Muñoz, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities
  • "5 College Digital Humanities Initiative," Marisa Parham, Amherst College
4:15-5:00 p.m. "Collections as Data: Conditions of Possibility," Thomas Padilla (BIO), University of California Santa Barbara


Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.

 


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Demystifying R: An Introduction for Librarians - MLA

Wednesday, October, 05, 2016, 2:00 - 3:30 PM, Health Sciences Library Room C2- 41C

 

If you work with researchers or stay up-to-date on “big data” or data science, you have probably heard of R. But what exactly is it, and why should librarians learn it? This webinar will help demystify this popular programming language and provide some real-world examples of how it can help librarians in their daily work. Whether it’s for assisting patrons with their research data or working with your own library data, R can be a useful skill to add to your librarian toolboxes. This webinar will provide an introduction to R, including how it can be used for data processing, visualization, and analysis of a variety of different types of data. We will also discuss some key terminology and concepts to get you started and provide you with resources for learning more about R.

Attendees will learn:

  • what the R programming language is and some of its key features
  • some key terminology and a basic understanding of how R works
  • some uses for that R may be a good solution for your data needs, including data processing and management, visualization, and statistical analysis
  • how R can be useful for working with research data, as well as with library data, including bibliometric data, library statistics, or budget data
  • where to find free resources for learning R

Presenter

 

Lisa Federer, AHIP, currently serves as research data informationist at the National Institutes of Health Library, where she provides training and support in the management, organization, sharing, and reuse of biomedical research data.


Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.


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Event Planning Training Workshop
Tuesday, August 16, 2016, 9:00 AM – 12:00 noon, Library West, Room 419   RESCHEDULED

Tuesday, October 11, 2016, 9:00 AM – 12:00 noon, Library West, Room 419 NEW DATE!
Training Facilitators: Elizabeth King, Harn Museum, Rebecca Jefferson, Barbara Hood, Anne-Marie Hollingshead

Each year, scores of events are hosted by the Libraries, and as we grow and move forward, more and more different types of events are likely to become a mainstay. But how does one plan an event like a pro?

If you are planning an event or will be doing so in the near future, you won't want to miss this workshop.  From it, you will learn about strategies professional event planners use to ensure a successful outcome.  Below is a partial list of anticipated learning objectives.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this training workshop, you will be able to:

 

*Articulate the goal of your event
*Prepare a budget
*Construct a timeline
*Identify resources needed
*Discuss thematic and practical concerns
*Develop an effective marketing and outreach strategy
*Determine best ways to engage and communicate with potential attendees
*Clarify the Libraries' policies on use of the Judaica Suite & Grand Reading Room
*Make use of the University's and Fiscal Services' guidelines for working with vendors

Registration: UF Libraries employees register through the Instruction and Training Database.

All other parties please register via email here.